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Shalom-education

Starting Young - Teaching Children's Rights in Tanzania

We promote Child Rights Clubs in schools, covering issues such as child marriage, FGM, domestic violence, disabilities, street children.... Last year, 7000 children participated...

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ossada-perus

50 Years on: The Military Regime, Slaughter, and Torture in Brazil

Brazil is remembering the 50 years since the military regime which began on 1st April 1964 and continued until 1985. The political scene here is that we are facing people who want those dangerous times back....

Appeal

DRC-empowerment

Empowering Survivors in DR Congo

Help Safe World Field Partner, COFAPRI, to support rape survivors and their children in the mountain villages of Eastern DR Congo.

World News

Frederic Kazigwemo served time in jail for killing several people in 1994 | Photo: Benjamin Duerr/Al Jazeera

Rwanda genocide survivors back reconciliation

Mbyo is a Reconciliation Village, located one hour's drive from the capital of Kigali. Murderers and survivors of the Rwandan genocide, are neighbors. Attempting to rebuild the country.
Caroline Murphy

UK Heiress walks away from fortune after rift over her plans to turn firm into a co-operative

UK
I have been vocal in my belief that leadership of this business must include those working on the ground if it is to continue to deliver for the clients who have placed their trust in us over the years.
IWMF-logo-3

International Women's Media Foundation: 'Protect Confidentiality of Sources'

IWMF (International Women's Media Foundation) urges the Supreme Court to recognize journalists' protection against compelled disclosure of confidential sources...
Pari Gul

The Afghan policewomen taking on the Taliban

The tiny but growing number of policewomen in Afghanistan not only risk death in the line of duty, they also face personal attack from extremists, and bigotry within the ranks

Field Partner News

Alliance News

fly-sister-fly

Partnering for advocacy in rural Kenya

Pastoralist Child Foundation and the Fly Sister Fly Foundation partnered for an advocacy campaign in Samburu County. They held interactive sessions on early marriages, FGM/C, and challenges girls face in the pastoral nomadic community.

Women in Uganda

Women in Uganda face a wide range of challenges including discrimination, low social status, lack of economic self sufficiency, and greater risk of HIV/AIDS infection.

More than 27 million out of a population of 32 million people live in the rural countryside of Uganda, the majority of whom have not been shielded from the harsh realities of poverty.

Lack of access to water and sanitation is already exposing rural women in conflict areas to more dangers like battering, rape and poverty. But with the looming impacts expected due to climate change, these dangers are feared to double.

Due to social gender roles, women are made responsible to meet water and sanitation needs of the family. In North Eastern Uganda, like Karamoja and Teso, a woman walks an average of ten kilometers in the dry season for water, spending 15-17 hours a week looking for water. This means that the same woman will spend two months of her time a year just walking long distances in search for water.

Girls too are being affected with the lack of water and sanitation---affecting their schooling the most and have to share toilet facilities with boys. Many of them have ended up dropping out of school. Discrimination against women due to gender violates women's rights, undermines their health and well-being and cripples development of individual women's status.

In Uganda, as in many African countries, gender discrimination means that women must submit to an overall lower social status than men. For many women, this reduces their power to act independently, become educated, avoid poverty, and/or escape reliance upon abusive men. Many girls and young women become coerced into sex or can be obliged to trade sex for economic survival.

It is common for girls to become sexually active at a much younger age than men, causing the rise of HIV/AIDS to become even more pronounced. Older men are breaking long-established social customs and choosing younger and younger girls to become their sexual partner in order to avoid catching HIV. In doing so, these men are in fact infecting them with HIV.

In some districts, HIV prevalence among 13–19 year old girls is at least 10 times higher than in males of the same age.