Safe World for Women Logo

Give to the Grassroots

Chidren get food Rations Picture 5

Supporting the Grassroots

The Safe World Field Partners Programme helps give a voice to grassroots women's groups around the world.

Field Partner News

WFAC-Workshop-2

Cameroon Post-2015: Gender Equality, Youth Sexual & Reproductive Health & Rights

It is imperative that the Cameroon government, among others, supports young people’s access to sexual and reproductive health services, including comprehensive sexuality education, gender equality, and investment in youth capacities and leadership...

World News

Report-Women

Report Women! Project Commences in Nigeria

The WSCIJ has begun its Report Women! Project.... the investigative reporting of girls and women training is aimed at building the media’s capacity to strategically report girls and women issues as well as mainstream girls and women into media reportage…

The parents of Ms Nafeek had repeatedly appealed to King Abdullah to pardon her

Source: BBC

January 2013

Saudi Arabia has executed a Sri Lankan domestic worker for killing a baby in her care in 2005, a foreign ministry official in Colombo has told the BBC.

The maid, Rizana Nafeek, had denied killing the four-month-old boy.

Her supporters say she was only 17 at the time of the killing. They say her execution is a breach of international child rights.

The Sri Lankan parliament held a minute's silence on Wednesday in honour of Ms Nafeek.

An MP who campaigns for Sri Lankan workers abroad, Ranjan Ramanayake, described the Saudi government as "dictators" who would never execute Europeans or Americans, only Asians and Africans.

The parents of Ms Nafeek had repeatedly appealed to King Abdullah to pardon her.

She was convicted in 2007 of murdering a four-month-old baby she was caring for in 2005.

Human rights groups including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have criticised the Saudi authorities for their handling of the case, as have campaigners in Sri Lanka, who argue that there were serious translation problems at the time she confessed to the crime.

They also argue that they she did not always have access to a lawyer, and that her reported execution breaches the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child which Saudi Arabia has ratified.

There has been no comment so far from Saudi Arabia.