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Compassion In Kenya


Compassion CBO

Safe World Field Partner in Kenya - Compassion CBO, was formed to eradicate poverty through education and sustainable development among women living in the slums and rural areas and to rehabilitate orphans and vulnerable children.

Survivors In DR Congo



COFAPRI is based in Bukavu in the eastern Democratic Rupublic of Congo The organisation empowers women through encouraging income-generating activities such as the rearing of livestock.

Field Partner News

Safe World Field Partner, work directly with issues such as poverty, health-care, marginalisation, FGM, child marriage, and education.

Margaret from Kiambu Support Group

Nairobi cancer survivor has hope at last

Margaret is among many women Compassion CBO trained in 2015. She has survived breast Cancer 2 times.

New Womens Magazine for Cameroon

The first edition of the Women for a Change Magazine is now available.

19-year-old SRHR college peer educators talk Feminisms

In most parts of our society, the word “Feminism” still remains a bitter pill for so many people to swallow, however, to Wfac’s college SRHR Peer educators, the ‘F’ word is about change, empowerment of all and transforming lives.
Sewing Skills Trophy

Traditional Leaders Celebrate Women's Economic Empowerment in Rural DRC

“COFAPRI is an amazing organisation that is spreading far in the mountains of our villages where bigger NGOs... are fearing to reach... I have decided to offer them a trophy for encouragement." Mr. Cishugi, Traditional leader in Nyangezi
FEMpads for freedom

Fempads Bring Freedom to Women and Girls in Rural DR Congo

FEMpads are made and sent by a generous UK citizen named Sharon Multani-colebrook. “Sharon has been a good mother for all of us... she is making our hearts feel at peace, feel loved." - COFAPRI member.
George Brook children

Eco-friendly School to Enable WYCF to Help More Children in Hillside Community

The new school will be built from lime-stabilised rammed earth. A technology proven in other regions of the world including East Africa, rammed earth is a cost effective, strong, durable, and environmentally-friendly construction method...

News, Interviews and Blogs

Under-reported issues affecting women and children. Exclusive interviews and articles by Safe World Correspondents and Student Writers


Narges Mohammadi - Women Human Rights Defenders Are Heroes, Not Criminals

On September 28th 2016 an Iranian appeals court upheld a 16-year sentence for 44 year old Narges Mohammadi, a prominent human rights defender. Mrs. Mohammadi is a key member of the campaign for the abolition of the death penalty in Iran, a lawyer by training,…
NGO Working Group

Global Call for Women's Participation in Peace Processes #UNSCR1325

Marking the 15th anniversary of the women peace and security agenda, the letter signed by 254 organizations across 55 countries calls for Member States to provide details of the progress made in meeting political, financial and political commitments made…

Life in Perspective

In the big picture, I suppose one person passing on at the grand age of 94 shouldn't be a shock. But we were Dad's carers and he was a major part of our lives. In the last few months, especially, our days and nights pretty much revolved around him..
Jo Cox memorial 2

Fear, Division and the EU Referendum

We need to re-evaluate our political system; it is time we started challenging politicians to drop the fear and hate and instead develop a system of open honest debate about the much bigger issues faced by both our society and the wider world...
Homeless in London

The UK's Hidden Homeless: Vulnerable Women

Homeless services in the UK are just not effectively rising to meet women’s needs. A model of care tailored to the once male issue needs to be redeveloped, to ensure provision of female spaces and safe hostels, child support, legal action against violence,…
Narges Mohammadi

Narges Mohammadi: On Trial in Iran for Defending Human Rights

Narges Mohammadi is mother of two and has been deprived of seeing her children for the past eight months... In order to put pressure on this political prisoner, all her medicine was taken away from her upon her transfer to her ward and she has been deprived…

Laura Pollan - leader of Ladies in White

Cuba 'Ladies in White' protest blocked in Havana

Source: BBC

Government supporters in Cuba have prevented the "Ladies in White" dissident group from holding a protest march in the capital, Havana.

Shouting insults and slogans, a crowd of hundreds massed outside the home of the group's leader, Laura Pollan.

The dissidents had been planning to march to church on the Day of Our Lady of Mercy - patron saint of prisoners.

Government security agents looked on but did not intervene as the two groups argued. There was no violence.

Waving Cuban flags, the pro-government demonstrators shouted "Worms!" and "Get out!" at the 35 dissident women inside Laura Pollan's House.

They also set up a sound system that blared out the Cuban national anthem.


Cuba's small dissident movement often faces harassment from groups of government supporters.

The communist authorities say such demonstrations are spontaneous reactions by ordinary Cubans, but the opposition say they are orchestrated by the government.

The Ladies in White group is made up of wives and daughters of dissidents who were jailed in a 2003 crackdown on opposition activists.

The prisoners have all been released over the past year under a deal brokered by the Roman Catholic Church, and some have gone into exile in Spain.

But the Ladies in White have continued to campaign for the release of around 50 other prisoners convicted of violent crimes such as hijacking which they say are political.

The Catholic Church says the authorities have stepped up a campaign of low-level harassment of dissidents in recent months.

The Cuban government generally refer to dissidents as mercenaries paid by the US to destabilise the communist system.


About Laura Pollan

Laura Pollan is one of the “Ladies in White”, who has been demonstrating in Havana for the release of relatives imprisoned for their criticism of the Cuban government.

Her husband, Héctor Fernando Maseda Gutiérrez, 67, is an engineer and independent journalist and one of 75 people arrested during a crackdown by the authorities in March 2003.

He received a 20-year prison sentence after being convicted under laws that Amnesty International believes to be so vague that they are currently being interpreted in a way that infringes fundamental human rights.

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