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Grassroots Men and Children Speak Out - Women's Empowerment is Progress for All!

“COFAPRI is truly giving power to our wives, daughters, and our sisters and girls in our villages here. This helps them primarily, but it also helps us all with our families." - Bukanda Isaac, DR Congo.

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Wurrie-Kenda

Children's Education in Sierra Leone - Overcoming Challenges

Wurrie Kenda has grown up in Kroo Bay without any education. She is now at the Community School and is learning quickly. It is children like Wurrie that make WYCF's school such a special place....

Appeal

DRC-empowerment

Empowering Survivors in DR Congo

Help Safe World Field Partner, COFAPRI, to support rape survivors and their children in the mountain villages of Eastern DR Congo.

World News

Frederic Kazigwemo served time in jail for killing several people in 1994 | Photo: Benjamin Duerr/Al Jazeera

Rwanda genocide survivors back reconciliation

Mbyo is a Reconciliation Village, located one hour's drive from the capital of Kigali. Murderers and survivors of the Rwandan genocide, are neighbors. Attempting to rebuild the country.
Caroline Murphy

UK Heiress walks away from fortune after rift over her plans to turn firm into a co-operative

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I have been vocal in my belief that leadership of this business must include those working on the ground if it is to continue to deliver for the clients who have placed their trust in us over the years.
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International Women's Media Foundation: 'Protect Confidentiality of Sources'

IWMF (International Women's Media Foundation) urges the Supreme Court to recognize journalists' protection against compelled disclosure of confidential sources...
Pari Gul

The Afghan policewomen taking on the Taliban

The tiny but growing number of policewomen in Afghanistan not only risk death in the line of duty, they also face personal attack from extremists, and bigotry within the ranks

Field Partner News

Shalom-education

Starting Young - Teaching Children's Rights in Tanzania

We promote Child Rights Clubs in schools, covering issues such as child marriage, FGM, domestic violence, disabilities, street children.... Last year, 7000 children participated...

Alliance News

fly-sister-fly

Partnering for advocacy in rural Kenya

Pastoralist Child Foundation and the Fly Sister Fly Foundation partnered for an advocacy campaign in Samburu County. They held interactive sessions on early marriages, FGM/C, and challenges girls face in the pastoral nomadic community.

Denying girls school entrenches poverty: report

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Denying girls school entrenches poverty says report

Source: AFP/Dawn.com

Millions of girls worldwide are not going to school, an education gap that condemns them to lives of hardship and entrenches broader extreme poverty, a new report said Thursday.

The report, “Because I am a Girl: The State of the World’s Girls 2012,” was released in New York by Plan International on the United Nation’s first International Day of the Girl.

“The estimated 75 million girls missing from classrooms across the world is a major violation of rights and a huge waste of young potential,” the child poverty alleviation group said in launching the report.

A total of one in three girls is denied education, but Plan’s report focuses especially on the 39 million girls aged between 11 and 15, right on the cusp of becoming young women, who are out of school.

The report, which coincided with the news this week of a 14-year-old Pakistani girl gunned down for her criticism of Taliban campaigns against girl’s education, underlined the hugely positive impact that school can have on girls in poor countries.

“An educated girl is less vulnerable to violence, less likely to marry and have children when still a child herself, and more likely to be literate and healthy into adulthood, as are her own children,” Plan International CEO Nigel Chapman said.

“Her earning power is increased and she is more likely to invest her income for the benefit of her family, community and country. It is not an exaggeration to say educating girls can save lives and transform futures.”

Plan called on global leaders to ensure a minimum of nine years’ schooling for all children, giving them a better chance to enter secondary education.

But special priority should be given to girls, the humanitarian organization said, with greater funding and programs to stop child marriage and violence in schools, two main reasons for the current dropout rate among girls.

In many cases, poor families pull daughters from school out of fear for their health or safety.

In Ghana, 83 per cent of parents interviewed for the report said the risks of pregnancy were a disadvantage of school.

The report said that in Togo, 16 per cent of children interviewed named a teacher responsible for a classmate’s pregnancy. That figure was 15 per cent in Mali and 11 per cent in Senegal.

In Ghana, 75 per cent of children said teachers were the main source of school violence.

The opposite trend is also true, with school attendance leading to an ever-widening series of benefits.

“If adolescent girls stay in school and obtain real skills, research shows that they will earn more income in the future, marry later, and have fewer and healthier children,” Plan said. “In the longer term, secondary education protects girls against HIV and AIDS, sexual harassment and human trafficking.”

As the report came out, Pakistani teen Malala Yousafzai was fighting for her life after being shot in the head in broad daylight on a school bus.

Her struggle resonated with tens of thousands of girls denied an education by militants across northwest Pakistan, where the government has been fighting local Taliban since 2007.